Dell Technologies
BMS-center-logo
 

Light-trucks Contract Goes to Oshkosh:VAMBOA

No comments
Share this Article:
Share Article on Facebook Share Article on Linked In Share Article on Twitter

oshkosh - VAMBOA

By Debbie Gregory.

The U.S. Army’s search for a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) replacement is over. The Oshkosh Corporation, formerly Oshkosh Truck, more about has won the $6.75 billion contract to build almost 17,000 new light trucks. The new vehicles will replace the Army and Marine Corps’ aging Humvees.

Wisconsin-based Oshkosh Corp. beat out both Lockheed Martin Corp. and AM General LLC.

The order will result in the production of as many as 55,000 JLTVs over the next 25 years.

Founded in 1917 as the Wisconsin Duplex Auto Company, the company was created to build a severe-duty four-wheel-drive truck before moving into the military vehicle arena.

In 1945, the company received the first of many military honors when the “E” award is presented by the Army and Navy for excellence in wartime production. In 1953, the first Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) vehicle was delivered to the U.S. Coast Guard. In 1968, the MB-5 manufactured for the U.S. Navy and mainly used for flight deck firefighting, launched the company into a position of world leadership in the ARFF industry.

Over the years, the company has built other military vehicles, such as the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Trucks, the P-19 ARFF, the R-11, and the MTVR.

The new trucks will replace many of the 120,000 Humvee trucks built by AM General that have been worn out by use in Iraq and Afghanistan. The updated design promises greater protection against mines and roadside bombs, as well as more range and durability to move troops and gear. They are also lighter than the Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicles introduced in Iraq.

News of the contract resulted in a 12% jump in the company’s stock.

VAMBOA proudly serves all Veteran and Military Business Owners.

VAMBOA: Loan Advantage for Veterans Passes

No comments
Share this Article:
Share Article on Facebook Share Article on Linked In Share Article on Twitter

actBy Debbie Gregory.

The Veterans Entrepreneurship Act of 2015 was passed by the Senate on July 23, 2015. The amendment is added to the Small Business Act. It prohibits the Small Business Administration (SBA) from collecting a guarantee fee in connection with a loan made under the SBA Express Program to a veteran or the spouse of a veteran on or after October 1, 2015. There is a provision to exempt the act during any upcoming fiscal year for which the President’s budget, submitted to Congress, includes a cost for the program that is above zero.

The amendment also requires the SBA to assess for Congress the level of outreach to and consultation with female veterans regarding access to capital by women’s business centers and Veterans Business Outreach Centers.

Additionally, starting October 1, 2015, the act prohibits the SBA from guaranteeing a loan if:

the lender determines that the borrower is unable to obtain credit elsewhere solely because the lender’s liquidity depends upon the guaranteed portion of the loan being sold on the secondary market, or

the sole purpose for requesting the guarantee is to allow the lender to exceed its legal lending limit.

The Veteran and Military Business Owners Association (VAMBOA) is a non-profit business trade association that promotes and assists Veteran Business Owners, Service Disabled Veteran Owned Businesses (SDVOB) and Military Business Owners. Small businesses are the backbone of our economy and responsible for job generation. That is why VAMBOA provides its members with Business CoachingContracting Opportunities, a Blog that provides information, Networking contacts and other resources. Membership is FREE to Veterans. Join Now!

VAMBOA: Loan Advantage for Veterans Passes: By Debbie Gregory

Grants for Veterans in Technology: VAMBOA

No comments
Share this Article:
Share Article on Facebook Share Article on Linked In Share Article on Twitter

vamboa grant

By Debbie Gregory.

As military members complete their tours of duty, re-establishing their careers may be one of the most important tasks in returning to civilian life. Some may be returning to careers that were interrupted during the time they served, but many are starting from scratch. Though the job market is showing some signs of improvement, it’s a slow rise, and those returning veterans are only adding to the many already vying for available jobs. This is one reason many veterans are coming home with aspirations of starting their own businesses.

Entrepreneurial endeavors may be the desired direction, but a good number of veterans express the difficulty acquiring their startup funds to be their biggest challenge. While most industry sectors have veteran business-owners, be it manufacturing, consulting or service industries, technology-related businesses appear to be increasingly popular for veteran entrepreneurs.

Banks are not as willing to establish loans for startup businesses. This leaves potential business owners needing to resort to other means to get their enterprises underway, be it self-funding, crowd-funding, or acquiring funds from friends, relatives, angel investors and venture capitalists. When those resources do not prove to be sufficient, an alternative is exploring government grants specifically for veterans in technology.

There are some stipulations. For example, while the federal government cannot provide grants to a business in the startup phase, it can provide grants for veteran-owned technology firms once established. Two in particular, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, average $2 billion in grants awarded each year. Administered by the U.S. Small Business Administration, the businesses most likely to be awarded grants from these programs fall into the small high-tech category, related to healthcare, education, public safety and criminal justice.

With numerous opportunities for gaining financial stability, and informational resources, such as those available through organizations like VAMBOA (Veteran and Military Business Owners’ Association), startups for veteran entrepreneurs are, indeed, attainable. Of the 28 million businesses in the U.S., approximately 2.4 million are veteran-owned, and this number is growing.

VAMBOA: California Business Portal

Those who own a small business — or want to start one — now have a one-stop source of information about the how-tos.

California’s Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development this month set up a website dedicated to answering basic questions about starting, running or relocating a business.

Users also can use the portal to obtain licenses and permits, as well as to learn about state and local regulations and find links to additional information on government incentives.

The site is at www.businessportal.ca.gov and is accessible on both iOS and Android cell phones and other devices.

Reach Rowena Coetsee at 925-779-7141. Follow her at Twitter.com/RowenaCoetsee

source: http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_28482650/website-set-up-help-small-businesses?source=rss

VAMBOA: Hats off to Ohio Lawmakers

No comments
Share this Article:
Share Article on Facebook Share Article on Linked In Share Article on Twitter

ohio

By Debbie Gregory.

There are a number of states that have laws or executive orders that aim to assist Veteran owned businesses. Some states, such as California and New York, require a percentage of state contracts be set aside for businesses owned by service-disabled veterans.

Ohio lawmakers are currently considering a bill to provide a bid preference of 5 percent or $5, 000 to Veteran-owned businesses competing for state contracts.

State Rep. Niraj Antani, the Republican joint sponsor of the bipartisan bill, rightfully feels that Veterans deserve a preference for having served their country.
“It’s our moral obligation to do what we can to help them,” Antani said.

The bill has had its first hearing before the House Ways and Means Committee. It will require at least one more hearing before a committee vote can be made on sending it to the full House.

According to a 2007 U.S. Census Bureau survey, there are more than 88,000 Veteran-owned businesses in Ohio and 2.4 million nationally.

The Ohio Small Business Development Center at Wright State focuses on the Veteran business community by helping Veterans learn about entrepreneurial opportunities.  They also assist Veterans by providing resources and contact information for employment options and other veteran related services.

It is widely accepted that skills such as leadership and discipline gained through military training make Veterans great entrepreneurs.

“Veterans are a cornerstone of small business ownership,” said Barbara Carson, acting associate administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Veterans Business Development. She added that Veteran business owners have helped build one of the longest periods of economic growth in U.S. history, following World War II.

Bidding preferences and set-asides for Veterans have sometimes drawn opposition from minority- and women-owned business groups concerned that adding Veterans might dilute their opportunities and slow some efforts. But most Americans will agree that the Veteran set-asides are an earned right for service to our country.

The Veteran and Military Business Owners Association (VAMBOA) is a non-profit business trade association that promotes and assists Veteran Business Owners, Service Disabled Veteran Owned Businesses (SDVOB) and Military Business Owners. Small businesses are the backbone of our economy and responsible for job generation. That is why VAMBOA provides its members with Business CoachingContracting Opportunities, a Blog that provides information, Networking contacts and other resources. Membership is FREE to Veterans. Join Now!

VAMBOA: Hats off to Ohio Lawmakers: By Debbie Gregory

ibmpos_blurgb